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Wheat Bread

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My family loves this wheat bread. It is a mix of wheat and all purpose flour which produces a smooth texture that is the right balance. Not as heavy as a whole wheat bread and with more substance than a white bread. I love the nuttiness of a wheat bread, but sometimes whole wheat is too dense for a sandwich. This bread strikes the balance and is so easy to make.

About ten years ago I fell in love with whole wheat pastry flour and started using it in more of my recipes. I find I have good results if I stay close to a 50-50 ratio of whole wheat pastry flour to AP flour. My latest baking add in is ground flax seed. I add it to my breads, sometimes to my muffins, and even my oatmeal and protein shakes. I have been experimenting on how much I can add without crossing the line from ‘amazing boost in nutrition’ to ‘gritty what were you thinking!’ So far I am up to 3 T in this wheat bread with super results. I think next week I will try 4 T. I use my Kitchen Aid mixer to do most of the work, but you can mix and knead this by hand if you want.

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Wheat Bread
Not as heavy as a whole wheat bread and with more substance than a white bread. I love the nuttiness of a wheat bread, but sometimes whole wheat is too dense for a sandwich. This bread strikes the balance and is so easy to make.
Servings
loaf
Ingredients
Servings
loaf
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Dissolve the honey and molasses in the water and sprinkle the package of yeast in the liquid. Allow the yeast to bloom for five minutes.
  2. In a separate bowl sift the whole wheat pastry flour, All Purpose flour and salt. Stir in the flax seed meal. Place half of the flour mixture in the kitchen aid mixing bowl with the dough hook attached and stir in the yeast/water mixture. Starting at a slow speed and increase the speed to medium. Add the rest of the flour mixture 1/2 a cup at time until the sides of the bowl are clean. (It usually takes all of the flour.) The dough will be a little sticky. Let the mixer stay on medium speed for 4 more minutes to knead the dough. You can also knead the dough on your counter. I do a little of both because I enjoy kneading the dough and will sprinkle a little flour on the counter and knead it about 10 times.
  3. Grease a bowl with vegetable oil and place the dough in the bowl.
  4. Cover the bowl with a damp towel and place it in a warm place to rise until it has doubled in size. My oven has a proofing setting (100 degrees F). I usually let it rise for about an hour and a half. If you are ready to bake punch it down, shape it into a loaf, put it in a prepared pan, cover and let it rise for 30-40 minutes.
  5. This is where the recipe is super flexible. If you are not ready to bake the loaf, you can do like me and put plastic wrap over the bowl and place it in the fridge while you go to church. When you are ready to bake, take the dough out of the fridge, punch it down, shape it into a loaf and let it rise for about an hour. If I remember, I will cut a few slashes in the top of the bread about half an inch or so deep. This will give it a pretty look when it is done.
  6. Pre-heat your oven to 400 degrees F, then bake your loaf for 25 - 30 minutes until it sounds hollow when you tap it. Let the loaf stay in the pan for 3-5 minutes after you take it out of the oven. I like to rub a little butter on top when it comes out of he oven to make the top crust softer and shiny. Tip the loaf on a cooling rack and allow it to cool before storing. Best if eaten within 2 days. We have never had any left longer than 2 days!
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